Menu

“70-Point Venue Checklist” FREE DOWNLOAD

2013 Charity Auction book, Discount Code Boost Save $5

Boost Your Benefit Auction book

Find It Now

>

Simplify! Follow this Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog.

© 2015 GALA GAL, Inc. - All rights reserved.

Firstyme WordPress Theme.
Designed by Charlie Asemota.

►Cruise Raffle

August 23, 2017 - Author: Jenelle Taylor, CAI BAS
lapel pin of blinking ship

Selling chances to win for that cruise or yacht trip!

Ah, the Chance to Win, doesn’t most every event have one?

Of course, the very first thing you need to do is familiarize yourself with your state’s (and sometimes city) raffle, gaming, gambling, drawing statutes.

Did you know that in Florida, you can’t require anyone to pay for a ticket?

Print out the Florida statute here.

Once you know the rules, this is a great option for the “blinky lights” pin to show who bought a chance to win (and, obviously, who hasn’t yet).

Do you know that Holland America has a reduced-price program that your nonprofit might qualify for? It’s a great program with a reasonable fixed cost, and never expires. Check it out here.

If you’re selling chances to win a cruise or a yacht excursion, instead of generic pins consider these cute things, found at FlashingBlinkyLights.com. It’s themed, flashy, and if you don’t want to pin into guests’ fancy clothes, then simply attach each to a lanyard or a wrist-tie ribbon like my client.

Here’s to selling those chances and raising big money!

Categories: Better Buyers, Consulting, Event Logistics, Other Money Makers, Raffles/Chance Drawings

►Raffle pricing

May 1, 2015 - Author: Jenelle Taylor, CAI BAS
poster showing raffle ticket pricing

Fingertips for $40

Recently a client asked me about raffle (Chance to Win drawings) pricing.

“I found this on-line as a guideline to selling tickets. Does this make sense?

Raffle ticket sales:  3 tickets for $5, 6 tickets for $10 and finger tip- to-finger tip $20″

Here’s my take:

1. Raffle chance pricing depends on the value of the prizes to be won.

2. Calculate the math equation: How much do you want the raffle to raise (have a goal),  who will be asked to buy tickets and what pricing feels exciting to them, and how many tickets (at what level) can you expect to sell? PRICE x QUANTITY = MONEY RAISED

3. In the example you found, “3-$5 and 6-$10” are the same odds, so there’s no incentive to spend $10 rather than $5.

4. The PURPOSE of unequal odds (increased chances for paying more) is to wildly slant the odds in favor of those more generous. We want to encourage folks to donate more. In Florida (and other states-check your state gaming statutes*) all chances to win do not have to be equal.

5. So, I like

3 – $10, 8 for $20, or fingertip-to-fingertip for $40.

That way the focus is just on selling $40 worth, and if someone is considering $20, have them grab a friend and get tons more chances by splitting the fingertip-to-fingertip (which might be 40-ish tickets)

If the prize(s) are smaller, you could go with 2-$5, 7-$10, fingertips for $20

*A reminder to always know and follow your state regulations on raffles, which often fall under gambling policies. In some states, nonprofits are limited to one per year or need a special license. In Florida (and other states) drawings are required to have a “no purpose necessary to be entered” option, which is why setting any pricing for a chance drawing must be disclosed as a “suggested donation” See the Florida statute here, and happy fundraising!

Categories: Better Buyers, Charity, Consulting, Event Logistics, Other Money Makers, Raffles/Chance Drawings, Templates