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►Silent Auction – Bidder Blockers and Sheet Stealers

March 19, 2015 - Author: Jenelle Taylor, CAI BAS
photo of Gala Gal

Don’t let those “bid blockers” and “sheet stealers” ruin your auction!

If you’ve never seen one at your event, you’re lucky! While it’s great to have fast and furious bidding on your silent auction items, and it’s fun to watch that competition, too many times I’ve heard (or seen) heated bidders try to bend or break the rules of fair play.

I’ve seen Bid Blockers who square their shoulders and won’t let anyone else get to the bid sheet to bid against them, or Sheet Stealers who actually pick up or hide the bid sheet and try to sneak it back on the table right before closing time! I’ve actually seen someone rip up a bid sheet…twice! The same guy!

Anyway, if every year a few of your classroom projects or priceless opportunities create more bad blood than goodwill among your bidders, you’ve got a few options: either move those items to the main Live Auction, where peer pressure and encouragement will spur on the bidding, or post signs and make announcements reminding people that if your auctioneer sees a bidding war heat up, she plans to step over there and see who really wants it the most with an on-the-spot, mini live auction. It’s fun, it’s fast, and it’s fair.

But make sure to warn people first. And, of course, if you use mobile bidding for your silent auction, you’ll never have this issue again 🙂

What are your auctions most highly contested items year after year? How have you solved it?

Categories: Better Buyers, Consulting, Event Logistics, Silent auctions

►Silent Auction, or Mini On-the-Spot Live Auction?

March 10, 2015 - Author: Jenelle Taylor, CAI BAS
photo of easels with poster-sized bid sheets

Draw attention to a row of Can’t Miss items

What to do when you have so many great auction items that you can’t even fit them all in to the time slotted for the Live Auction?

Most live auctions at charity events are 30-45 minutes, and with an industry average of 3-4 minutes per live auction sale, that means only 10-15 items make the Live Auction cut for many events.

What if you have 20 awesome items that you need to get in front of bidders? I suggest blowing up the bid sheets to 20″ x 30″ mounted on foam board, place them on easels in a very high traffic area, add signage, place 1-2 full-time volunteers who never leave and can answer all questions about the items, and then get into the mindset of a county fair carnival barker, “Ladies and Gentlemen, don’t miss this awesome opportunity right here. Step right up to bid on ….” You get the idea.

Sometimes, I place these easel items in a semi-circle directly in front of the ballroom doors, and I let the crowd know that these items -while available for normal bidding during the silent auction – will be closed by on-the-spot, mini live auction between 7:40-7:45, immediately before the doors open for dinner. All interested in bidding need to gather here at 7:40 to get a last chance to be the winning bidder.

By doing this, we get as close as we can to the energy, excitement and ego of a live auction even though there wasn’t time in the program. As guests gather, I gets everyone’s attention in the vicinity and say, “Ladies and Gentlemen, we’re now going to close these 5 SUPER silent auction items by mini live auction. They are such great items that we didn’t want anyone to miss the opportunity, so whether you’ve already bid or not, everyone is welcome to bid right now as we close these awesome items. First up, you’ve been bidding on Item 901, 1 week RCI Timeshare anywhere in the world, valued up to $1800. The current bid is $1200, but who’ll go $1300, do I hear $1300, yes and now $1400…” Each item will take just seconds to close, and inevitably we’ll raise several hundred more dollars, remind folks that a professional auctioneer will entertain them later, and generate auction closing excitement right before releasing the guests to dinner.
Win. Win. Win!

Categories: Better Buyers, Consulting, Event Logistics, Live Auctions, Silent auctions

►SUPER Silent Auction items

February 23, 2015 - Author: Jenelle Taylor, CAI BAS
photo of bid sheet blown up to poster size

Great way to make sure everyone sees your best silent auction items!

How do you make sure that the more significant, valuable or noteworthy items in your silent auction don’t get lost among the smaller items and packages?

Sure, you can make a small section of silent auction with somewhat larger displays, or target spot lighting (or both). For just a few dollars, you can really make a statement and get bidders’ attention.

Sometimes I call these “Almost Live” items, meaning that they were good enough for the live auction, but either we already had the live auction spots all filled, or this event doesn’t have a live auction.

Simply save the ready-to-print bid sheet as a PDF and have FedEx/Kinko’s blow it up to 20″ x 30″ for $4 (black and white). Whether it’s one item or 10, having a super-sized bid sheet will help ensure you get the eyeballs (and bids) you want.

Since color displays of this size would be crazy expensive (like $20-40 each), we just printed the color photos, slid into clear slip sleeves from Office Depot, and attached via O-ring and ribbon. Guests still bid just like a normal bid sheet, though we did have Sharpies on hand to make bids easier to see.

Which items will be SUPER at your next auction?

Categories: Better Buyers, Consulting, Event Logistics, Silent auctions

►Auction Jewelry Displays

February 13, 2015 - Author: Jenelle Taylor, CAI BAS
photo of a jewelry donation

Think ahead to plan how you will display jewelry donations

Isn’t it a tiny bit sad when you see jewelry at auctions just lying flat on the table? Surely that isn’t the best way to showcase that donor’s contribution, or encourage the most bids?

Some options, from easiest to most elaborate:

1. Drape necklace over a corner of the plexi sign holder or description frame
2. Cut a length of pretty ribbon and attach earrings or bracelets to the ribbon
3. Gift-wrap (in a solid or metallic paper) a small flat box (perhaps 6″ x 8″ x 1″ high) to place the jewelry on
4. Buy stand up jewelry displays from Michael’s or from a Dollar Store
5. Arrange to borrow jewelry displays from the donor (but make sure to label so your donor gets them back)
6. Use lighted clear plexi boxes for luxury jewelry items to mimic the actual jewelry retailer effect.

By the way, an easy way to remember that you’ll need specialty display items before you get to the venue to set up is to add a column or field in your auction item database called “Needed for Display.” Here you can make months weeks or months in advance about how many easels, jewelry displays, gift-wrapped boxes, clip-on lighting, props or other display enhancements you’ll need to bring.

Here’s to better auction displays. Cheers!

Categories: Better Buyers, Consulting, Event Logistics, Silent auctions

►Silent Auction – This Section Closes

January 22, 2015 - Author: Jenelle Taylor, CAI BAS
photo "This Silent Auction Sections Closes at 6:50"

Post Silent Auction closing times for each section

Don’t you get this question ALL the time?

“What time does the silent auction close?”

Or worse yet, you have patrons complaining after a section has already closed that they didn’t know.

You can put auction closing times in the program, but we all know hardly anyone reads the program, and especially not while they are shopping, holding a cocktail and an appetizer plate.

So put signs on each table or row, at least 2 per section. If you use 4″ x 6″ signage, put 6 or more on each row of tables. What’s the harm?

If there’s a chance (due to traffic, slow registration, or a quirky chairperson) that your silent auction closing times might change, here’s a secret: print several options for each section and just hide them behind the front one. For instance, you can have signage display “This section closes at 7:30” but also have a 7:40 and a 7:45 printed out and hidden behind, so if you have to change the rules on the fly, you can. Keep in mind, though, you need to do this in conjunction with big, bold, loud announcements to keep the crowd up to date. You don’t want to upset any bidders, so you can say over the microphone, “Folks, due to some heavy traffic we have guests just now arriving, so you’ll notice that this section will NOW close at 7:45. Please see the signs on each table.”

Make it easy for people to spend money – by being clear about the closing times!

(Note that with handheld (text) bidding, you won’t have this issue. Alerts about closing are sent to bidders’ devices, assuming they still have battery life!)

Categories: Better Buyers, Consulting, Event Logistics, Silent auctions

►Silent Auction – Item Numbering

January 8, 2015 - Author: Jenelle Taylor, CAI BAS
photo of silent auction display

Make it clear which Bid Sheet matches which plexiglass or framed display

Let’s face it: at most silent auctions, there are a lot of items and bid sheets on the table. When you’re on the auction committee, it’s easy for you to know at a glance that the basket on the left with the blue ribbon is the “Family Fun Night” basket and the one on the right with the red ribbon is the “Italian Fest” basket (duh!). But to your guests, it’s all just a mash up of colors, fluff, and paperwork.

Make it easier for people to spend money by clearly labeling and numbering each package up for bid. I like to place each bid sheet directly in front of its plexi display, and I make sure the auction section and number on each are clearly visible.

Or you can invest in mobile (text) bidding and folks will see the image you’ve uploaded with each auction item 🙂

Categories: Better Buyers, Consulting, Event Logistics, Silent auctions

►Silent Auction – Displays for Baskets

December 18, 2014 - Author: Jenelle Taylor, CAI BAS
photo for a coffee basket

Don’t want to take a photo of each basket? Find a funny image

When I attend other auctions, I often see groups that don’t make a stand-up display for baskets or physical items, thinking that the item “sells itself.” I don’t agree.

I like the continuity that every auction lot, whether physical item or certificate-not-on-display, gets a standardized written description, displayed either in a frame, an acrylic slanted sign holder, or a foamboard with attached easel back. This makes the tables organized, balanced, consistent, and polished.

So, what do you put as a visual for a basket that’s right next to it on display? Sure, you could take a picture of the basket, but to me that doesn’t add anything, so I try to find an image (Google Images) that’s cute, funny, or will make the viewer chuckle with recognition. That wine basket gets the “I love wine” graphic, and the coffee basket gets the cutesy, “Life is short. Enjoy your coffee.”

OH, and make sure that a list of what’s in the basket is either in the typed description or attached by a nicely typed card attached to the actual basket.

Will your next auction have better basket descriptions?

Categories: Better Buyers, Consulting, Event Logistics, Silent auctions

►Silent Auctions – Levels

December 9, 2014 - Author: Jenelle Taylor, CAI BAS
photo of silent auction display

Make visually interesting silent auction displays with boxes and levels

I’ve talked before about changing the levels on your auction displays. Having a variety of levels above the table’s surface makes a huge difference in visual appeal.

I think the easiest way to add levels to a silent auction is by gift-wrapping empty cardboard boxes. Gather 1 box for every 4-6 silent auction items, anywhere from an 8″ high to 24″ high, and wrap them in whatever colors or prints match your theme. I get inexpensive paper from Dollar Tree or Michael’s. These boxes can be wrapped weeks in advance and transported to the venue easily in garbage bags. Or if you have a ton of volunteers for day-of auction set up, boxes can be wrapped on site. Sometimes volunteers are standing around looking for a job to do.

In the photo, you’ll see a different, more subtle way to create levels. It takes a bit longer to slide a box under the tablecloth and then adjust, adjust, adjust to get it right, but it’s another way to create levels while keeping the tables looking less cluttered.

No matter which way you do it, you MUST add levels to your next auction display!

Categories: Better Buyers, Event Logistics, Silent auctions

►Silent Auction Displays, sample

November 18, 2014 - Author: Jenelle Taylor, CAI BAS

photo of silent auction display

If you’ve got a trip, help people spend money with photos of the resort(s)


No matter how good your descriptions, it’s the visuals that sell a trip.
For every hotel, weekend getaway, B & B, home stay, condo, time share, yacht, resort or castle, include as many visuals as possible. If it’s a high-end package, especially in the live auction, it’s a great idea to use technology to really showcase the destination. Have gorgeous photos visible in a looping digital photo frame (you know you’ve got one lying unused around your house!), or a laptop or an iPad. Assign a volunteer if you’re worried about someone walking off with your display.
For all the other stays in your silent auction, just get the visuals on display, preferably on a brochure or promotional sheet with the donor’s logo for added validity and trustworthiness.
For your attendees to want to bid on a vacation, they have to really *see* themselves there!

Categories: Better Buyers, Consulting, Event Logistics, Silent auctions

►Silent Auctions – Better Displays

November 6, 2014 - Author: Jenelle Taylor, CAI BAS
photo of silent auction display

If the donor sent a brochure, display it!

If you’ve ever been in the office or on the committee when donations come in the mail, you know that many of them include an informational or promotional piece, like a brochure, menu of services, takeout menu, postcard, folder, etc.

It may be your first inclination to give these items to the winning bidder, so you just stash them away in the winner’s envelope with the certificate.

DON’T!

In order to make it easy for people to spend money (one of my mantras), make sure promotional items that would help potential bidders understand an item, see the value, or get excited are put on display next to the bid sheet. Either stuff into a clear plexi sign holder, or, for small items, I lean them against a 4″ x 6″ plexi.

If you hide all the juicy details until after the bidding is over, you’ve lost the opportunity to promote your donors and encourage more (and higher) bids. Promote your items better next time!

Categories: Better Buyers, Consulting, Event Logistics, Silent auctions

►Silent Auction Posters

October 21, 2014 - Author: Jenelle Taylor, CAI BAS
photo of a silent auction poster

Make it easy for people to spend money by hanging a poster listing this silent auction section’s items in order

Here’s a simple way to make it easier for people to shop your silent auctions.

This is just a table made in Excel with columns for the Item Number, Item Name, and an extra column where later you will write in the winning bidder’s name or number.

Simply save the table as a PDF, and then FedEx/Kinko’s can blow this up to a 20″ x 30″ for about $4 in black and white. You can tape or spraymount it onto a standard foam core board (about $4 at Michael’s craft store). If you’re going to hang it, attach a cord or ribbon.

These boards should be easily visible (up high!) within each auction section, and make sure that the items are then displayed in the order listed on the board. Guests should be able to look up at the board, see “514 Massage, Mani, Pedi” and walk right to that bid sheet to bid. If you have electronic (text) bidding, signage like this still helps guests to see what items interest them at a glance.

After each silent auction section closes, it’s fast and easy to write in winning bidders and display these in front of the Checkout area so patrons can easy check to see who won.

Categories: Better Buyers, Consulting, Event Logistics, Silent auctions

►Auction Signage, the Signs

October 7, 2014 - Author: Jenelle Taylor, CAI BAS
photo of silent auction signage

Clearly label each silent auction section

People often ask me about the Silent Auction Signage I use.
Providing much of the standard event signage is one of additional benefits I provide to my nonprofit clients. Why should each of my clients spend hundreds of dollars on signage they’ll only use once a year?
Instead, over the years I’ve purchased all kinds of handy signage, and I can pull from this stash and bring 8-12 signs for a client, saving them time, hassle and money. (With the added benefit that I know we’ll have good signs to add polish and professionalism!)

Ask your auctioneer if they provide signage that says:
-LIVE AUCTION
-SILENT AUCTION (or silent auction section names like SUPER SILENT, DON’T MISS, BLING THINGS, OUT ON THE TOWN, or many others)
-REGISTRATION (and/or EXPRESS CHECK-IN, REGISTERED ONLINE, WILL CALL, NEED TICKETS)
-CHECKOUT (and/or PAY HERE, CREDIT CARD CHECKOUT, CASH/CHECKS CHECKOUT, EXPRESS CHECKOUT, -DONATIONS ONLY, GET INVOICE HERE)
-PICK UP ITEMS (or ITEM HANDOVER)
-CHANCE TO WIN
-PURCHASE TICKETS
-BIG BOARD

If that’s not part of the services for the auctioneer you choose, then I hope these signage ideas help you to create your own signage and make it easy for your guests to experience all your event has to offer them!

Categories: About GALA GAL, Consulting, Event Logistics, Live Auctions, Silent auctions

►Silent Auction Signage

September 20, 2014 - Author: Jenelle Taylor, CAI BAS
photo of silent auction signage

It’s easy to see these silent auction sections

In 2004 I built these tabletop sign poles for a client. They are about 5 feet high, and have a wide base meant to sit on top of the table so that guests can see and read them from 50-100 feet away across a ballroom or down a long hall. The problem I see groups make is either that they don’t have any silent auction section signage at all, or the signage they have is lost on the tables or lost on easels, only readable to the handful of folks standing within a few feet.

Get your auction signage higher, clearer, and bolder.
Make it easy for people to spend money!

Categories: Better Buyers, Consulting, Event Logistics, Silent auctions

►Registration – Make it easy to find

September 10, 2014 - Author: Jenelle Taylor, CAI BAS
photo of Registration table in lobby

When possible, have your Registration tables be the first thing guests see

Isn’t it handy when your ballroom or event space is directly in sight from the hotel’s main entrance? There’s often a lot of distraction in a hotel lobby, so do everything you can to make it easy for your guests to stroll right to your Registration tables. Update the hotel’s electronic billboards, of course, but also add mylar balloons every so often down a corridor, or post volunteers (with nametags) along the hallway. Easels with posters welcoming guests to the events (and possibly thanking sponsors at the same time) are another good option.

A fast and easy entrance to your event enhances your first impression. An a free glass of champagne at the door helps too!

Categories: Consulting, Event Logistics

►Best Auction Items

August 28, 2014 - Author: Jenelle Taylor, CAI BAS
Picture by Moyan Brenn on Flickr

Picture by Moyan Brenn on Flickr

This article made me smile!

I am always telling both nonprofit committees and auctioneers in the BOOTCAMP class I teach about the Best Categories for Auction Items, in order of desirability.

While most committees think they need to “get stuff” for the auction, in fact, “stuff” (physical items) often hasn’t the lowest potential for selling above retail value, because we all have enough “stuff” already, and we can all find out what “stuff” costs with a quick check of our phones.

But experiences? Experiences – whether exclusive, travel, attendance, pampering, indoor, outdoor, solo or group – experiences mean memories, the joy of human life.

And, according to this article http://qz.com/255963/another-reason-to-spend-money-on-experiences-rather-than-things-the-positive-benefits-of-anticipation/ research suggests that auction attendees will actually enjoy spending money more due to anticipation of a future experience!

anticipation of an experience is more exciting and pleasant than the anticipation of a material purchase—regardless of the price of the purchase”

So, ask your Professional Benefit Auctioneer to help you brainstorm unique experiences for this year’s gala, and up the anticipation (and excitement) for your guests.

Oh, and after Experiences, what are the other Best Categories for Auction Items, in order of desirability?

1. Experiences

2. Food and Wine

3. Travel Near and Far

4. Entertainment

5. Pampering

6. “Stuff” (tangible items whose value is readily found online)

Go get creative! Call me for help 🙂

Categories: Better Buyers, Consulting, Live Auctions, Other Money Makers, Silent auctions

►Dates Still Open!

August 21, 2014 - Author: Jenelle Taylor, CAI BAS
image Jenelle Taylor Auctioneer

Summer’s already over! It’s auction time once again

August is wrapping up, winding down, and the Fall Fundraising Season is full of fantastic events! I’m currently working with nonprofits in Tampa, Naples and Orlando, catching up with returning clients and happy to add 3 new events so far this fall.

Just this week I’ve helped committee members select auction items, design bid cards, a choose mobile bidding provider, figure out how many volunteers they’ll need, edit the event timeline, and energize the Board! I’ve still got some dates open, so just shoot me an e-mail if you think I might be the one for you.

Categories: About GALA GAL, Auctioneers

►Give Day Tampa Bay!

May 6, 2014 - Author: Jenelle Taylor, CAI BAS
Give Day Tampa Bay logo

May 6, 2014

Let’s DO this!

Please join me in helping great causes during this 24-hour fundraising challenge. Today, nonprofits in Hillsborough, Hernando, Pasco and Pinellas counties who’ve registered for Give Day Tampa Bay will get a big boost in donations with your help.

Grab a friend, sit down with your kids, and simply click over to http://givedaytampabay.org/ and decide who should get your $25 (or more).

And don’t forget, numerous studies confirm that giving to charity usually increases your own happiness! How much money can greater Tampa Bay give in just one day?

Categories: Charity, Other Money Makers

►WOW! Does your auction team look like this?

May 1, 2014 - Author: Jenelle Taylor, CAI BAS
photo of Gala Gal and team

Your Auctioneer and Bid Spotters can look like this!

I am so thankful to these four lovely ladies for joining me a few weeks ago for a fantastic live auction and scholarship Fund-a-Need for the 18th annual Starry Starry Night!

All 5 of us are Florida-licensed auctioneers with specialized training in fundraising, and they did an awesome job working the crowd as Bid Spotters for me.

Would your big event benefit from an all-female team?

Your auction doesn’t have to look like everyone else’s. It can look like this 🙂

Categories: About GALA GAL, Auctioneers, Live Auctions, Other Money Makers

►BIG Giving went up in 2013!

January 1, 2014 - Author: Jenelle Taylor, CAI BAS

While the numbers aren’t out yet about how much average Americans gave last year, gifts over $1M are up over 2012, and there’s nothing bad about that!

I’m glad to hear that the largest single gift came from Facebook’s founder, and wowed to see that he and his new wife’s gift is valued at nearly one billion dollars. With a B.

The largest donation of 2013 came from Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan, who announced in December that they had given 18 million shares of Facebook stock to the Silicon Valley Community Foundation. The gift was valued at more than $990 million. This was the first time donors under the age of 30 have made the nation’s largest philanthropic gift, according to the report.

Read about the Chronicle of Philanthropy’s report here, and hope some trickles down!

Categories: Charity

►Live Auctions and Opening Bids

November 21, 2013 - Author: Jenelle Taylor, CAI BAS

Flummoxed about where to start live auction bidding?

Today one of the fabulous auctioneers who has attended my “BOOTCAMP for Benefit Auctioneers” course e-mailed me with this question:

There is much debate on “starting” bids at B&C (benefit & charity) auctions.  In commercial auctions we start where we think the FMV (fair market value) is….come down till we get a bid….and go till they stop.  I have used this technique in B&C’s but some people start way low and get more people involved.  I am really curious to get your perspective.  And….do you do it different if there is a minimum….consigned item?

If you’ve attended even one live auction, I bet you’ve wondered as each item is being described, “I wonder where the bidding is going to open?”

At your charity fundraising gala, many people in your audience have that question too! Attendees often come up to me at the Live Auction Preview Table and ask, “What’s the opening bid for this package?” My typical response is, “Well, it’s my job to help you win this item. Where would you like it to start?”

Where each live auction package opens for bidding sets the tone for fundraising. One school of thought says to open the bidding at a low level (10-35% of retail value) in hopes of getting more bidders to jump in and get caught up in the auction excitement. If the bidding starts low and doesn’t quickly get a bunch of bids, however, what does that say to the crowd?? It might be sending the message, no-one-wants-this-item, no-one-is-bidding, this-is-a-fire-sale-not-a-fundraiser.  Not the tone you want to set. On the other hand, if the audience perceives the opening bid to be so high that no one raises a bid card, you risk losing the auction participation and momentum.

Where to start the bidding on your charity gala’s live auction packages is a top concern faced by every similar event, and it’s why you want to trust your auction to a licensed, professional auctioneer who’s got both experience and specific fundraising training. A volunteer board member, DJ, or TV personality trying to be your auctioneer probably didn’t devote 90 minutes prior strategically gathering info at the Live Auction table, and he or she has much less experience with auction psychology, reading the crowd on the fly and knowing by instinct when to keep asking for a dollar amount and when to change things up.

I personally don’t like the technique used in commercial auctions of stating the retail price (fair market value) and quickly coming down (“Let’s start the bid at $5000, $5000 where, gimme $1000 and go…”). I’m not a fan of it when I attend an auction, and I think it’s confusing to a novice, non-auction savvy audience. Benefit audiences are on the whole unsure about the live auction bidding process, so I am always careful to be clear, easily understood, easy to follow and inviting to all.

I replied to my colleague that I honestly decide where to open each live auction package after I chat with all the attendees during the preview time. By then I know how much interest there is in each package and how much folks are expecting to pay. I auction by gut and by perceived value. For things $1000 and below, I often open at retail, but the values aren’t published, so I’m opening where I expect the crowd to join me. If it’s a private chef dinner for 6, then that certainly sounds more prestigious and inviting than $300 (the retail value) so I’d start at $300 and expect to go up. For items more in the $2K-$10K range, most of the time I open at 35-50%.

I rarely have to deal with consignment (items that aren’t donated but are a cost to the charity) because I don’t encourage it, but for that headliner consignment cost trip I follow the same as above typically: start at cost if the payback amount is $1000 or below, and for higher cost consignment items (some packages can require a payback cost of $5000-$10K or more!) I start below the minimum and take my chances. Auctioning items with high minimum required payback costs is nerve-wracking and not for the inexperienced DJ or Board member to try!!

Because auctioning items with a consignment payback cost always has the risk the bidding falling off and not reaching the minimum amount needed to sell it, I work with my clients to get a commitment in writing for how they want me to handle it if a consignment item doesn’t hit the minimum. As the auctioneer, I can either pass the item (awkward!), keep asking (and asking and asking and asking..UGH!) or disclose there’s a price below which I can’t sell it. Since none of those are very good options, I encourage the groups I work with to strive for 100% donated auction items. You keep all the money with none of the potential headaches and hassles. But, to do or not to do consignment is a whole ‘nother discussion, so let’s wrap this up by sharing how my colleague responded to the reply I sent him:

I think I will change my practice here.  That makes so much sense….and I do like to work off the cuff so to speak and change as I determine what the crowd is doing.  You may absolutely use the question and my name if you like.

Thanks Jenelle.

No, thank you, David Runte of Worstell Auction Company in Texas, for spurring a valuable discussion and helping so many groups raise more money!

Categories: Auctioneers, Consulting, Live Auctions